Skip to main content

Young Adult age group

Because I am a librarian I get asked this question a lot: What is the YA age bracket?
MY answer as someone that works with kids and parents is 15+... but the full answer is not that straight forward.
The term Young Adult means one thing in everyday society and another in the publishing world. 
In psychology, young adults are anyone between the ages of 18 to around 25. 
In the publishing world, young adult is a marketing term (not a genre as we often call it) and is geared to slightly older teens. Let's face it, it's a clever marketing term, not many teens like to be called a teen (because we usually refer to teens as immature and confused), so the term 'young adult' is much friendlier. It also works for older people (like myself) that enjoy that type of literature, hence YA literature does not have a maximum age. In fact, adults make up well over 40% of the YA market. 

In book publishing though, the marketing categories often are:   
  • children's books 0-8
  • middle grade/juvenile 9-12
  • young adult 12+  
  • new adult and adult fiction 18+
Now, take that with a grain of salt. Cleverly so, publishing companies are trying to maximize their market.
So there are three things you should keep in mind:
  • often when ya authors are asked their target audience they will answer 15+
  • if you go to a library, school or other, it is unlikely the age bracket above will be followed because many ya books are not considered appropriate for such young teens. And as a library worker I wholeheartedly agree. Six of crows for example caused us problems with parents because of the violence. Many books that deal with mental problems or abuse are too heavy for young teens too. There are exceptions of-course, but more often than not, 12 is too young of age for about 50% of the ya books out there.
  • last but not least, many readers that grow up reading a certain author will continue to call that author's books ya even if the author has tried to move away from it. Sarah J Maas being a perfect example. Acotar series is NOT ya, once the book has explicit sex scenes, it is no longer ya. And that brings up to a very new category in the publishing world: New Adult! New adult books are (put shortly here) all ya like books that have explicit sex. NA has the same style of writing and similar topics as ya, but it also provides what many adults miss in ya... 
I hope this helps! 😊 Any questions feel free to ask.



Comments

  1. I absolutely love your blogs! I saw your post on instagram so here's an extra entry! @alyssacorn0925

    ReplyDelete
  2. I admire this article for the well-researched content and excellent wording. I got so involved in this material that I couldn’t stop reading. I am impressed with your work and skill. Thank you so much. Read more info about Psychedelic Therapist

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

The Cursed King (Inferno Rising #4) by Abigail Owen

This series has been an absolutely delight and I am so glad I've read it. The Rogue King , the first book in the series is still very much my favorite. I discovered Abigail Owen through that book and have read a few of her other books since, this series -obviously-, and others. I highly recommend you all give this wonderful author a try. Blurb: He will burn. She will rise. Airk Azdajah, the rightful King of the White Clan, spent half a millennium being tortured by the false High King Pytheios. The only reason he’s alive is a curse— the man to kill Airk will be consumed in his own fire. Which is why Pytheios kept Airk alive, barely, unable to shift in his prison cage, driving the creature half of him into madness. Airk escaped, but he’ll never be truly free. What good is a king who can never let his feral dragon loose, never fly, and never lead his people? He’s better off dead. Angelika Amon is the last unmated phoenix. The problem? She has no powers. Zip. Zilch. Angelika hates bein

Promises and Pomegranates (Monsters & Muses #1) by Sav R. Miller

I was very excited about this read. The reviews are good, the people recommending it were people whose recommendations I have liked in the past. And in the end, at did like this one. But I will confess from the start that Promises and Pomegranates  did not blow me away. Blurb: Elena To most, Kal Anderson is a villain. Harbinger of death, keeper of souls, frequenter of nightmares. Doctor Death. Hades incarnate. They say he stole me. Usurped my fiancé and filled the cracks in my heart with empty promises. Imprinted his crimson fingerprints on my psyche and tried to set me free. They’re not wrong, per se. Except it was my choice to stay. Kal To most, Elena Ricci is an innocent. Goddess of springtime, lover of poetry, angel of my nightmares. Little one. Persephone personified. They say I ruined her. Shattered her virtue and devoured her soul like a succulent pomegranate. Embedded my evil as deep as I could possibly get and tried to set her free. They’re not wrong, per se. Except it was she

A Romance Catch Up!

 It has been a crazy month and I fell behind badly on my reviews! But here are some highlights for you. Barbarian Lover (Ice Planet Barbarians #3) Ruby Dixon  2.75/5 Although I liked this one it is my least favorite in the series so far. The book was going well until a little over the halfway point when it just doesn't read right. She accepts leaving someone behind too easily and although up to this point the book does a good job at dealing with infertility it all of sudden throws it all out of the window. So good, I will carry on with the series, but not great. A Precious Jewel (Stapleton-Downes #2) Mary Balogh  3/5 This was different, unique. And I like that about it. I have not read any other book quite like it. She is a prostitute;  he starts of as just any other client. The story was sweet and interesting . The MC comes across  rather clueless at times,  but it is somewhat endearing. The romance is believable  and they make a very charming couple! The Gunslinger's Guide to